Drew Pritchard's Hidden Value: Week 6 top finds

Mike Shaw
Written by: Mike Shaw
Posted on: 28 April 2016

Musical instruments, telephones and drink cabinets may not be unfamiliar items in the everyday household. Yet sometimes the seemingly ordinary can increase in value once you understand more about its origin.

Antiques expert, Drew Pritchard, reveals the backstories to his favourite pieces featured in this week’s Hidden Value.

Reed horn

Reed horn

Reed horn

Used for hunting, this reed horn has a lovely patina and would also appeal to train enthusiasts due to its connection with the railways. I would estimate this to be worth £300.

Wooden canvas

Wooden canvas

Wooden canvas

This piece has quite likely been removed from an item of furniture, possibly a room screen or a chest. Scenes were more commonly painted on paper, which was the standard way Chinese export furniture was made. The figures and colours look crisp and bright for their age. I would date this to be between 1870-1900 and would value the panel at £500 to £600.

Bakelite telephone

Bakelite telephone

Bakelite telephone

I really like this. Following the Second World War this was one of the first stylised items people could buy off-the-shelf for their home. This is the right colour and design for the period and nowadays they can be converted for modern use. I would estimate its value to be £180.

Drink cabinet

Drink cabinet

Drink cabinet

I can't see a maker's label, but after the Second World War the country wanted to party and it was common for people to have a drinks cabinet in their home. The item is very much of its time and it looks to be in good condition. I would date it to around the 1950s and would value it at the £120 mark.

Piano

Piano

Piano

The Bechstein piano is from a German manufacturer that started making pianos in the 1850s. A beautiful example of a grand piano that is highly sought after, I would estimate this to be worth in the region of £10,000 - £12,000.

This week it has been the culturally significant items that retain their value, particularly when they have some historical charm. So it’s well worth looking around your home and dusting off any items of interest – you could end up finding out more when you submit them into Hidden Value.

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